Video Archive

The Unmanageable Artist, A Respondent talk by Howie Chen, March 16, 2017

On Thursday, March 16th, Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art presented a respondent talk with New York based artist, writer, educator and curator, Howie Chen. Chen’s background in economics conjoins with a visual acuity resulting in a unique critical perspective towards the production and dissemination of art. For this talk, Chen took up managerial technologies in Western democratic societies as they have been shaped by increased demand for autonomy and a creative life. As a template for self-sufficiency, the ‘unmanageable’ artist now faces a critical crisis of contradictions and precarity. Using managerialism as a backdrop, he examined current dissonance within art discourse and its relation to the rise of neoliberalism and reactionary politics today.

As a respondent, Chen’s poetic, critical and interdisciplinary methodology resonates with Keefer’s treatment of class, interest in the visual language of marketing, exploitation of public trust, and abstracted circulation of information addressed in her solo exhibition, FIRST CLASS, SECOND THOUGHTS, INTERMINABLE SWELL currently on display at Plug In.

Howie Chen is a New York–based curator engaged in collaborative art production and research. His curatorial and institutional work experience includes the Whitney Museum of American Art and MoMA PS1 (New York). He is a founder of Dispatch, a NYC curatorial production office and JEQU, a research project to assess how sociological and cultural economic approaches to art world debates can augment artistic critique. In 2003, with artist Mika Tajima, he formed New Humans, a moniker for collaborations with musicians, artists and designers that was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial and has more recently undertaken projects at SFMOMA (San Francisco) and South London Gallery. Writings include IRL (Primary Information) and Transformers (Badlands Unlimited). Chen was recently The Jane Farver Memorial curator in residence at the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP).

Plug In ICA extends our gratitude to our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers.

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, as well as Investors Group and Wawanesa Insurance for the direct support of our youth programs.

Artist Talk with Jeneen Frei Njootli, Saturday, April 1, 2017

On Saturday, April 1, Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art presented an artist talk by Jeneen Frei Njootli. As an emerging interdisciplinary artist Frei Njootli is known for her performative sound pieces, sparse sculptural forms, community engagement and material sensitivity.

For this talk, Frei Njootli introduced us to her practice and her forthcoming project for LandMarks2017. She spoke to the consumption of the northern landscape, Indigenous bodies and their labour in visual culture as an ongoing set of problematics and politics that her work engages with. 

Frei Njootliis an interdisciplinary artist of the Vuntut Gwitchin self-governing Nation, whose home community is in Old Crow, Yukon. Her practice takes a critical approach to the materials she uses, which often reflect her investigations of the history of trade and intercultural exchange with a particular focus on “Bush Theory.” This term defines a way of navigating relationships to colonial power from a knowledge situated in the Arctic. Frei Njootli is co-creator of the ReMatriate Collective, a community located primarily on social media dedicated to Indigenous womxn’s self-determination. Her advocacy in this field is evident throughout her practice unfolding in her work as a cultural tattoo practitioner and facilitator of skill sharing workshops.

Jeneen Frei Njootli received her BFA from Emily Carr University, and is currently pursuing her MFA on unceded Musqueam territory at the University of British Columbia. Her work is gaining national recognition with exhibitions at the Macaulay & Co Fine Arts, Vancouver; the Vancouver Art Gallery; Trinity Square Video, Toronto; Art Mur, Montreal; and the Ottawa Art Gallery. In 2016, she won the William and Meredith Saunderson Prize for Emerging Artists from the Hnatyshyn Foundation. She is currently featured in the exhibition wnoondwaamin: we hear them at the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba, Brandon where she will have a solo exhibition in September 2017.

This artist talk is presented in partnership with the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba.

Plug In ICA extends our gratitude to our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers. With special thanks to our Director’s Circle.

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, as well as Payworks and Wawanesa Insurance for the direct support of our youth programs.

Stages Speaker Series: Krista Belle Stewart, March 18, 2017

As part of the Stages Speaker Series, Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art presented a screening of Seraphine, Seraphine by Vancouver-based artist, Krista Belle Stewart followed by a discussion (audio here). This event marked the premiere presentation of Stewart’s 2014 film in Winnipeg. Using two channels, Seraphine, Seraphine moves between two temporal moments joined by a central figure, Stewart’s mother, Seraphine Stewart. In this presentationa 1967 docu-drama aired by the CBC conveying the story of the first Indigenous public health nurse in British Columbia is situated alongside excerpts of personal testimonial taken in Vancouver by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2013.

The constructed relationship between the films resonates with Stewart’s practice, which regularly makes precise and meaningful use of archival material and relies on juxtaposition to expose colonial erasure and foreground Indigenous identity. This screening comes at a poignant moment, in the wake of recent public remarks by Conservative Senator Lynn Beyak who spoke lamentingly about the absence of a celebratory attitude towards the “kindly and well-intentioned men and women and their descendants” who worked in residential schools. Stewart often draws from her family’s history to address social and political perspectives that have and continue to conceal the direct suppression of Indigenous cultures.

Krista Belle Stewart is known for her ability to draw out the complexities of archival material that allow for both intimacy, coincidence, and a temporal meeting of histories across time. Working with video, photography, design, ephemera and textiles, Stewart straddles the gaps between personal and institutional histories through transparent mediation. Her work has been exhibited at the Vancouver Art Gallery; Presentation House Gallery, North Vancouver; Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; Mercer Union, Toronto; and the Esker Foundation, Calgary. Stewart holds an MFA from Bard College, New York. She is a member of the Upper Nicola Band of the Okanagan Nation and is currently based in Vancouver, BC.

Plug In ICA extends our heartfelt gratitude to our generous donors, valued members, and dedicated volunteers. You make a difference.

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts New Chapter Fund, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, as well as Wawanesa Insurance for the direct support of our youth programs

Interpreting [Interrupting] Youth Interpret Angie Keefer, FIRST CLASS, SECOND THOUGHTS, INTERMINABLE SWELL and Fred Sandback's, A Sampling Of Works

On Wednesday, March 22nd, Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art presented this interpretive video, and panel with the participants of Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art’s inaugural Interpreting [Interrupting] Youth program. 

For this screening Birehanu Bishaw, Vic tor, Brandon McPherson and Tessa Stewart will present a short interpretive video produced by them in collaboration with Plug In ICA, Just TV and the Broadway Neighborhood center. The video is a visual reflection of the youth’s collective and individual experience of the two exhibitions on display at Plug In ICA: Angie Keefer’s FIRST CLASS, SECOND THOUGHTS, INTERMINABLE SWELL and Fred Sandback’s Sampling of Works, as well as aspects of Plug In ICA’s permanent collection and architectural space. 

Interpreting [Interrupting] Youth is designed for youth ages 16 to 24. The program reverses a pre-existing interpretive model used within arts institutions who often produce short videos as educational devices. These videos often include interviews with artists or curators, images of artworks and installation shots; they often reference artists’ biographies, previous artworks, and at times, glimpse into artists’ studios. These videos are usually presented online or within the gallery or museum in close proximity to the artworks, and tend to place an emphasis on the artist’s and institution’s intention over the experience of the viewer. 

The “Interpreting [Interrupting] Youth” program inversely begins with the youth’s experience of the artwork, challenging conventional models of art interpretation by overturning basic roles of authority and authorship. 


Next session begins April 8th, 2017. For more information about this and other education programs, please contact Sarah Nesbitt at sarah@plugin.org. For general information please contact: info@plugin.org or call 1.204.942.1043.

Stages Speaker Series: Kara Hamilton, March 9, 2017

As part of the Stages Speaker Series, Plug In ICA presented an artist talk by Toronto-based, multi-media artist, Kara Hamilton.

Activating the history of set design, architecture, and craft, Hamilton’s work integrates objects of various materials, including brass, marble, and glass. Building prototypes that actively respond to their context, or props that may be potential collaborations, Hamilton’s exhibitions have been described as dioramic in structure, allowing viewers to move through the work, transformed into supporting characters to the objects that lead. Hamilton received her Bachelor in Architecture from the University of British Colombia, and her MFA in sculpture from Yale. She has shown extensively in North America and Europe at venues including Salon 94, New York; EFA Project Space, New York; Kate Werble Gallery, New York; Siegel House, Marfa, Texas; Taut and Tame, Berlin; G Gallery, Toronto; and Tatar Gallery, Toronto. She is represented by Salon 94. Hamilton with Kari Cwynar form the curatorial team of Kunstverein Toronto.

Plug In ICA extends our heartfelt gratitude to our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers. You are making a difference.

Plug In ICA gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts New Chapters Fund, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, as well as Investors Group and Wawanesa Insurance for the direct support of our youth programs.  

Stages Speaker Series: Toril Johannessen, March 6, 2017

As part of our Stages Speaker Series, Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art presented an artist talk by Norwegian artist Toril Johannessen. Working in a range of media including photography, text, drawing and installation, Johannessen’s practice borders on the scientific in her research into natural phenomenon from the collection of Icelandic Spar to the colour of the moon’s light. She focuses her research on perception, often building disorienting installations. For her talk, Johannessen presented an introduction to her work, with specific emphasis on Unlearning Optical Illusions (I), (II), & (III].

Toril Johannessen’s practice often engages in methods and source material from the domains of science. Thematically her work spans a wide range of interests, from visual perception to linguistics; impossible energy cycles, alternative methods for time measurement; optical illusions and spatial disorientation. By combining scientific fact and the history of science with her own investigations, she applies a critical and subjective view on the impact of modern science on the production of knowledge. She received her MA from the Bergen Academy of Art and Design. In addition, she spent a year studying at Mountain School of Art, and took part in the artist-in-residence program at WIELS, Brussels. She has exhibited widely, at venues and biennales including dOCUMENTA 13; the Istanbul Biennial; deAppel, Amsterdam; Witte de With, Rotterdam; the Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna; Hasselblad Center, Gothenburg and Palais de Tokyo, Paris. Johannessen is a member of the Flaggfabrikken Centre for Photography and Visual Arts, a Bergen based artist collective.

Plug In ICA extends our heartfelt gratitude to our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers. You are making a difference.

Plug In ICA gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts New Chapters Fund, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, as well as Investors Group and Wawanesa Insurance for the direct support of our youth programs.  

Respondent Series Talk (Angie Keefer): Evelyn Forget, Markers of the Middle Class | February 16, 2017

As part of our ongoing Respondent Series, on Thursday, February 16th starting at 7pm, Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art presented a talk by Evelyn Forget. Forget is an economist, and is the Academic Director of the Manitoba Research Data Centre, as well as a Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba.

For her talk, “Markers of the Middle Class”, Forget responded to the shifting markers of social class provoked in Angie Keefer’s exhibition FIRST CLASS, SECOND THOUGHTS, INTERMINABLE SWELL on display at Plug In ICA between January 20th and March 26th, 2017. Here, Forget presented speculations about whether a perceived decline in the middle class accounts for the rise of populist movements today. She traced the evolution of the middle class and its characteristic attributes from the Netherlands in the 16th century, through the French Revolution to its peak in postwar America. As outlined by economist and historian Deirdre McCloskey, Forget identified a set of bourgeois virtues attributed to the middle class, and also the vices more often seen by outsiders – artists and bohemian critics.

Evelyn Forget is an economist and professor from the Rady School of Medicine at the University of Manitoba. Her research attempts to answer the question: “How can we best ensure that everyone has access to the tools and resources they need to live a full life?” She works in the areas of health economics and the history and philosophy of economics. Her public policy work examines the relationships between poverty, inequality, health and social outcomes, and quality of life. Most recently, she recovered and analyzed the data collected during a Guaranteed Annual Income experiment (called Mincome) that was conducted in Manitoba during the 1970s, and is currently involved in the development of a similar experiment to be conducted in Ontario this spring.

Angie Keefer, FIRST CLASS, SECOND THOUGHTS, INTERMINABLE SWELL is generously sponsored by Video Pool and William F. White International Inc., Winnipeg.

Plug In ICA extends our gratitude to our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers.

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, as well as Investors Group and Wawanesa Insurance for the direct support of our youth programs.

Plug In ICA relies on community support to remain free and accessible to all, and enable us to continue to present excellent programs. Please consider becoming a member of Plug In ICA and a donor at plugin.org/support or by contacting Angela Forget: angela@plugin.org

For media inquiries please contact: Sarah Nesbitt at sarah@plugin.org or by phone at (204) 942-1043. For general information please contact: info@plugin.org. For media inquiries please contact Sarah Nesbitt: sarah@plugin.org

RELATED PROGRAMS:

Thursday, March 16 | 7:00pm: Respondent Series: Talk by Howie Chen
Friday, March 24 | 7:00pm: Respondent Series (Fred Sandback exhibition): Talk by Edward A. Vazquez

Related exhibit: 
Angie Keefer, FIRST CLASS, SECOND THOUGHTS, INTERMINABLE SWELL

Artist Talk with Dominique Rey, October 27, 2016

Dominique Rey is known for her serial and researched work that draws its subject matter from different female subcultures. From women working as strippers, to those who choose to join a particular catholic sect of nuns, Rey observes as well as immerses herself into these communities as she documents and frames individuals and the spaces they occupy. She has a strong voice that filters through her work, which centres on photography as well as expands into performance, sculpture and painting.
 
Rey presented her recent artworks — a selection of which are included in Plug In ICA’s Fall 2016 group exhibition Superimposition: Sculpture and Image. The exhibition joins artists who contend with the spatial terms of sculpture while also contemplating the flat surface of images. Rey’s work in the exhibition samples two different bodies of work, but both use photographs as the bases to construct abstract forms through sculpture, collage and assemblage.

Dominique Rey is a multidisciplinary artist based in Winnipeg, Canada. She holds a BFA from the School of Art, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; an MFA in photography from the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York; and an MFA in new media from the Transart Institute, Donau University Krems, Berlin. Rey’s solo exhibitions include Under the Rose Arch, MacLaren Art Centre, Barrie;Erlking, Southern Alberta Art Gallery, Lethbridge, Alberta; and Selling Venus/Vénus au mirror at Gallery TPW, Toronto; Alternator Gallery, Kelowna; Plug In ICA, Winnipeg; Michael Gibson Gallery, London, Ontario; and Le Centre d’art et de diffusion Clark, Montreal. Her work has also been included in Material Girls, Doris McCarthy Gallery, Scarborough and the Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina; Material Self: Performing the Other Within, Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto; MAWA: Celebrating 30 years of Women’s Art, Winnipeg Art Gallery, Winnipeg; and Attitudes in Latitudes – The Northern Wild explores the Tropics, Art Center/South Florida, Miami Beach. Her art appears in numerous collections, including the National Gallery of Canada, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the Province of Manitoba, and the Wedge Collection. Rey is the recipient of various awards and honours, most recently the Canada Council for the Arts International Artist Residency at La Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris. In addition to her art practice, Rey is an assistant professor in the School of Art at the University of Manitoba.

Plug In ICA gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, as well as Investors Group and Wawanesa Insurance for the direct support of our youth programs. We extend gratitude to our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers.

Curation as Agency, Transformation and Guardianship | Curator talk with Michelle LaVallee, July 28, 2016

Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art is honoured to co-present a talk with Michelle LaVallee with Wood Land School. An accomplished artist, curator and educator, LaVallee is the Curator at the Mackenzie Gallery in Regina, Saskatchewan. Activating and developing greater understanding of misrepresented or marginalized histories is of personal and political import for LaVallee whose critical thought is influenced from her experience working with Indigenous peoples in Canada, El Salvador, Australia and Aotearoa (New Zealand).   

LaVallee will speak about her research-oriented artistic and curatorial work as part of Wood Land School: Thunderbird Woman, this year’s iteration of Plug In ICA’s Summer Institute. WLS takes up the powerful imagery of Daphne Odjig’s Thunderbird Woman (1973) as a conceptual point of departure that articulates Indigenous agency, the roles of guardianship and protection, and the notion of transformation. Artist Duane Linklater and curator Jaimie Isaac lead a group of participants through a series of texts, films, field trips and studio time for three weeks in the city of Winnipeg. Other associated events included a talk and discussion by curator Cathy Mattas and screening of a film by Darryl Nipenak, and will include an artist and curator talk by Julie Nagam, as well as open studios and a wrap party on August 5, 2016. 

LaVallee is an artist, curator and educator. She is of Ojibway ancestry, and a member of the Chippewas of Nawash Band, Cape Croker, Ontario. In 2011, she was sent to the Venice Biennale with the Canadian Aboriginal Curators Delegation; the 2010 and 2008 Biennale of Sydney and in 2006, she received the 2006 Canada Council for the Arts Assistance to Aboriginal Curators Grant for Residencies in the Visual Arts. As an artist, LaVallee uses a variety of media, provoking the expectations of stereotypical imagery and so-called traditional media. Her work has been shown in a range of international exhibitions including: Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City; Combine, part of “Love, Saskatchewan” at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto; Flatlanders: Saskatchewan Artists on the Horizon at the Mendel in Saskatoon; and in Myths of the Land with members of the Canadian Group of Seven and their contemporaries, Norval Morrisseau and Ron Noganosh, at the Ottawa Art Gallery.

Plug In ICA gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, and we extend gratitude to The Winnipeg Foundation and all our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers. 

Curating as Kitchen Table Talk: Curator talk with Cathy Mattes, July 21, 2016

Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art is honoured to co-present a talk by Cathy Mattes with the Wood Land School. As an internationally distinguished curator Mattes is known for her curatorial strategies that emphasize audience participation and direct engagement. As an educator at the University of Brandon, Mattes makes connections between politics and art with the understanding that artists can enact social change. Drawing attention to marginalized art histories, Mattes contributes essential labor towards shifting dominant narratives in the presentation of contemporary art and curatorial practices. 

Mattes will speak about her curatorial practice as part of Wood Land School: Thunderbird Woman, this year’s iteration of Plug In ICA’s Summer Institute. WLS takes up the powerful imagery of Daphne Odjig’s Thunderbird Woman (1973) as a conceptual point of departure that articulates Indigenous agency, the roles of guardianship and protection, and the notion of transformation. Artist Duane Linklater and curator Jaimie Isaac lead a group of participants through a series of texts, films, field trips and studio time for three weeks in the city of Winnipeg. 

The Wood Land School: Thunderbird Woman opens its doors to the public on July 21stwith a curator talk by Cathy Mattes from 10am-12pm. That evening, Plug In will host “Patio Lanterns,” our summer party and joint opening reception for The State and Wood Land School. On July 28, artist and curator Michelle LaVallee will speak from 10am-12pm, and on Friday August 5th, join us for open studios and a wrap party, details to be confirmed.    

Cathy Mattes is a proud Michif writer and curator based in rural Southwestern Manitoba. Her practice focuses on the intersection of Indigenous issues and art, with an emphasis on community, which she sees as a complicated concept, to be explored, questioned and located. Interested in creating better conditions for Indigenous cultural workers, Mattes has served on the board for the Urban Shaman Gallery, and collaborated with Indigenous cultural workers in Australia and Venice. Her curatorial projects includeFrontrunners, Urban Shaman Gallery and Plug In ICA; Blanche: KC Adams & Jonathan Jones, Chalkhorse Gallery, Sydney Australia; Rockstars & Wannabes, Urban Shaman Gallery, and Transcendence – KC Adams, Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba. She has lectured nationally and internationally, and in 2010 she was selected as a delegate on the Canada Council for the Arts’ Aboriginal Curators Delegation to New Zealand and Australia. In addition to her freelance work, Mattes was the curator at the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba between 2003 and 2005, and has been a consultant for various government agencies and arts organizations. She is an Assistant Professor teaching art history at Brandon University in the Visual and Aboriginal Arts Department, and is pursuing her PhD at the University of Manitoba in Native Studies. 

Wood Land School participant-subsidies generously supported by an annonymous donor. Plug In ICA gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Manitoba Arts Council and Winnipeg Arts Council. We thank the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for their support of our 2016 and 2017 program, and we extend gratitude to The Winnipeg Foundation and all our generous donors, valued members and dedicated volunteers.